The Art of Cross Stitch

The Art of Cross Stitch

We are all familiar with embroidery as it is among the oldest art forms in the world. There are examples of ancient Egyptian threadwork that are stunnigly beautiful and intricate. (pic) Various forms of embroidery have been discovered from Medieval times as well. (pic) The use of embroidery in society continued to be used right through the Middle Ages to the current day. The working of needle and thread on fabric served many purposes such as identification of family crests or patterns, decorations on clothing, as a sign of esteem on burial cloths, even as a form of record keeping in lieu of modern day pen and paper.

Embroidery developed into several sub-categories, depending on different traditions in different regions. Cotton was used in the Near East, silk in the Far East, and even copper was used by the Incas in South America. Different types of stitches on different types of fabric began to emerge. These include needlepoint, tapestry, crewel, blackwork, cross stitch, and counted cross stitch. They can be stitched on aida, canvas, linen, silk, paper, et al. It can be embellished with beads and sequins, and stitched with with cotton floss, yarn, or silk. The possiblities are endless. The stitches may vary in number and size, in colour and thickness, and how closely they are placed. They can be in the straight lines as is done with backstitching or blackwork, in the form of an X as in cross stitching, all parallel lines from bottom left to top right of the fabric as is done with needlepoint. Essentially, embroidery can be any combination of needle, thread, and fabric.

 

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